fashion history

One Last Look at #MyVintageCover 2018

last look myvintagecover, theartyologist

Well, now that it is almost the end of September, it’s a perfect time for a round up featuring all the #myvintagecover contributions. . .  from August. . . this is so late it’s embarrassing 🙁 But better late than never- and I really couldn’t not share this years covers, because they were SO GOOD. We had 22 covers created by 15 participants (including myself) and several of the participants created more than one cover! Some of the images were “inspired by”, some of the women sewed garments specifically for the cover and others created an image so similar that you had to double check to see which was the original. The creativity of the photos was truly inspiring! I hope you enjoy taking a look at them!

tanithrowan

Tanith Rowan– the creator of the #myvintagecover challenge- did a superb job recreating this cover from 1958. This was the perfect cover for her to recreate as she is a milliner and the hats in her image are her own designs! Check out her Instagram for more lovely hats!

vintagerosegirl

I have been wanting someone to recreate this cover, but never expected than anyone would do it. When I saw that Eliza of @vintagerosegirl had chosen this cover I actually gasped out loud- because I thought her image was the original and had to do a double take!

Next up are these three fun covers from Margaret of @denisebrain_vintage. She put in such attention to detail and some serious photo editing skills! And, seriously, how cool is it that she actually had the same dress from that first cover!?!?!

Christine of @foggydayvintage chose three iconic images to recreate, and she did an amazing job on them! (How perfect is that first one based on Grace Kelly’s stunning gown?!?) Take a look back through her Instagram feed- she has several other recreations of images of Marilyn Monroe too!

Another fabulous image by @auntieestablishment this year! How did she get that pose so perfectly in place? And furthermore- how did she hold it long enough to get the photo?!?

This image by @feelingfamousstudios was inspired by vintage covers and really captures the feeling of old fashion magazines, with a touch of Old Hollywood Glamour, I think!

irreverantvintage

The veil! The yellow gloves! The fur! The brooch! The navy jacket! Kelsey of @irreverantvintagegirl did such a good job of getting all of the pieces together for this cover! I love how it turned out.

nooneknows_itsyou_missjackson

I love this fun cover by Hannah of @nooneknows_itsyou_missjackson and how the neckline of her top is the same as the original image.  Choosing a vintage Coca-Cola ad was such a good idea- and it’s even better because you can still get retro Coke bottles to finish it off perfectly!

missziggyshortcrust

A picture of a silent film star is a great idea! @missziggyshortcrust captured the feeling of this image of Australian silent film star Sylvia Breamer. Her felt hat, shaggy sweater, collared blouse, tie and film-style 20’s lipstick look great!

Lindsay of @odettenoir sewed these two lovely garments and took the opportunity to pose like the pattern illustrations. Not only was she able to take part in the #myvintagecover challenge, but she also has two lovely new garments to add to her wardrobe!

parlourduck

I love how Rhiannon of @parlour_duck got this pose so incredibly correct! Even the angle of the hat is spot on! Illustrated covers are always tricky to replicate because they aren’t true to life- but she definitely succeeded with this great recreation!

petersilieundco

Here is another cover featuring a garment made specifically for the cover challenge. @petersilieundco embroidered those circles onto the fabric in order to create this skirt! I love how it turned out!

I love the wit of Lydia’s “Vague” cover, and I can’t believe I never thought of that before! The model on the original cover really does look like she is vaguely confused. And, I love seeing another illustration come to life. Thanks @wereallyareromantic for two great covers!

selbstdiefrau

Bianca of selbstdiefrau blog submitted this cover via email. She took the opportunity to sew up a vintage pattern- and it looks like the perfect piece for summer!

And last, though you’ve already seen them here on the blog, I’ve included the two covers that I did, since it’s fun seeing them side by side like this!

Well, there’s another year of #myvintagecover come and gone! I loved seeing all of these cover recreations- and it’s so exciting to see our little challenge growing!  I am so glad we had so many wonderful participants, and some new participants this year. Thanks to everyone who joined in this year- I can’t wait until next August!

Vintage Covers: Vogue April 1963, A Chic Accessory

Vintage Covers: Vogue April 1963, the artyologist

What is more chic for Summer than the classic straw hat? With a rounded brim and soft golden colour, this piece is perfect for the season, no matter where you will be.

Vintage Covers: Vogue April 1963

So, it is already August 8th and I still never announced whether #myvintagecover is happening again this year. It is.

You can read here for more info (it’s exactly the same as last year: just insert 2018 instead of 2017). Oh and check out the instagram hashtag too- there are already lots of amazing posts. It’s been lovely seeing people join in! I was planning to only do one cover this year, because I wasn’t sure if I would have enough time to do another, but this one went together relatively quickly, so maybe I will get around to doing another one after all? Do you plan to join in and recreate a cover?

What the Grahams Wore on Easter Sunday: A Fashion Moment with Canadian Home Journal 1941

What the Grahams Wore on Easter Sunday, Canadian Home Journal 1941, the artyologist

Just what will the Grahams wear for Easter Sunday? Why, I’m so glad you asked . . . because I just happen to have a three page spread showing just that!

what the grahams will wear, Canadian Home Journal 1941 the artyologist

My brother gave me this Canadian Home Journal from April of 1941, this past Christmas, and I’ve been eagerly waiting to share it with you all, because there is an entire section in the magazine featuring Singer sewing machines, and Butterick patterns! I haven’t figured out yet what I am going to wear this Easter Sunday, but any of these patterns would be delightful, don’t you think? It’s too bad I won’t be able to make any of these lovely dresses, but at least we can enjoy looking at them, right?

The article on the right page talks about how Mrs. S. Armstrong, of Montreal, wanted to have “more pretty clothes- for much less money”, and so she decided to sew them herself. However, there was just one problem- she didn’t know how to sew! But, no problem, she just went to her nearest Singer Sewing Centre, and enrolled in their Three Free Lessons. “There the obliging sewing instructress showed her how easy and simple it is to sew- and save- the Singer way.” Now Mrs. Armstrong has become “quite the expert” and “does all her own sewing- on the modern Singer electric Mr. Armstrong gave her for her birthday”. Furthermore, “the Singer Sewing Centre in your town is always ready to help you. Go there for wardrobe ideas, for advice on a sewing problem, or for “short course” lessons in dressmaking or home decorating. All these services are free!” Well, I just want to pop over my local vintage Singer Sewing Centre now, don’t you?

what-mrs-graham-taught, canadian home journal 1941, the artyologist

This dress, above, is just perfection!

striped-blouse, canadian home journal 1941, butterick 1419 and butterick 1440, the artyologist

I love this striped blouse and suit from Butterick 1440.

what-they-will-wear, canadian home journal 1941, the artyologist

Here is what Margaret, Ailsa, Dorothy, and Peg Graham will wear.

orange-dress, canadian home journal 1941, butterick 1444 and 1451, the artyologist

Dorothy likes the “high surplice neckline” of Butterick 1444 and the “wide midriff belt” of 1451, above.

wardrobe spice, canadian home journal 1941, butterick 1407 and 1453, the artyologist

Ailsa “likes the shirred pockets” in this Butterick 1407 suit. Also pictured is Butterick 1453. On the other page, we are shown how to add some “spice’ to your outfit!

wardrobe-spice, canadian home journal, the artyologist

There will be “many pleasant uses for these important additions to the Spring costumes they are planning”.

butterick dresses, canadian home journal, butterick 1462 and butterick 1160, the artyologist

Margaret likes the “saddle shoulders in both the dress and the coat of this ensemble because they give a broad shoulder line”. Broad shoulders were definitely the thing in the 40’s! Butterick 1462 includes both the coat and the dress. And Peg, on the right, likes the “slim lines of this reefer which buttons up to a high collar” Butterick 1160 and 1465.

cape, canadian home journal 1941, butterick 1456, the artyologist

And lastly, my favourite is this ensemble with Butterick 1456. I love everything about this: the cape, the handbag, the cool folded hat. . .  the officer (haha just kidding!)

Which of the patterns from this issue of Canadian Home Journal do you like the best? Don’t you wish you could still order things from old magazines and catalogues, when you browse through them? Have you ever seen an issue of Canadian Home Journal before? And, have you picked out what you are going to wear for Easter yet?

A Fashion Moment McCall’s Treasury of Needlecraft: Evening Shawls

A Fashion Moment with Vintage McCall's Treasury of Needlecraft: New Year's Edition, The Artyologist

Happy New Years! Well, almost. In honour of the most glamorous time of the year, I thought it was a great opportunity to share these images from the McCall’s Treasury of Needlecraft, featuring some wonderful knitted and crocheted evening shawls and wraps.

Nowadays there seems to be a trend towards New Years parties where the guests are encouraged to wear pyjamas. This, Dear Readers is a tragedy. Not because pyjama parties aren’t loads of fun- they can be (although not my cup of tea), but because New Years is the most glitzy holiday of them all, and if you can’t wear a cocktail dress out on New Years, just really when are you going to wear it? So, I vote that this year, instead of continuing the trend towards casualness that our culture is embracing, if we are going out to celebrate, we instead don our most glamorous garments possible. Or, if you are staying in, your most glamorous housedress and robe 😉 To be honest, I am not going to be going anywhere on New Years Eve, so I’ll probably not be wearing anything very fancy that night. . .

Anyways, without further ado- some glamorous evening wear from the 1950’s!

Vintage McCall's Treasury of Needlecraft, evening shawls, The Artyologist

I love the cape-like look to the one on the left.

Vintage McCall's Treasury of Needlecraft, shawl, The Artyologist

This kind of looks like a table runner. . . but the rest of her outfit is glamorous, so I’ll forgive it. 🙂

Vintage McCall's Treasury of Needlecraft, new years evening shawls, The Artyologist

Vintage McCall's Treasury of Needlecraft, vintage evening wear, The Artyologist

Vintage McCall's Treasury of Needlecraft, evening shawls, The Artyologist

Vintage McCall's Treasury of Needlecraft, evening shawls, The Artyologist

Such a pretty zig zag pattern.

Vintage McCall's Treasury of Needlecraft, knit evening shawls, The Artyologist

Which of the evening shawls and shrugs is your favourite? I personally really like the first picture, with the yellow dress and sparkly jewellery.

I hope you all had a wonderful Christmas, and that you have a Happy (and glamorous) New Year celebration however you spend it!