fashion history

A Fashion Moment With Newlands’ Knitting

A Fashion Moment with Newlands, the artyologist

With the advent of a New Year, in the Northern Hemisphere, we find ourselves smack dab in the middle of winter. I think that this is the perfect time to share some more vintage knitwear, don’t you think? It is the season for cardigans and sweaters, after all, and I haven’t shared any for quite a while. The last time was. . . at the beginning of November, so I would definitely say we are overdue for another instalment of A Fashion Moment. Today our Fashion Moment is with Newlands.

A Fashion Moment with Newlands, the artyologist, textile mill

Who was Newlands? Well, Newlands & Co. Limited was a textile mill located in Galt (now Cambridge), Ontario, Canada. It was established in 1884, and in 1916 was merged with the Galt Robe Company to become Stauffer-Dobbie Ltd. It was a major Galt textile manufacturer of the time. At this point, the history is a bit fuzzy, but somewhere along the way, their textile division started a line called “Lady Galt” which made towels, draperies, bed linens and yarn goods. Lady Galt was available from the 1930’s to the 1970’s, as I can find some advertisements, but I don’t know exactly when they started. At some point they began to make mainly towels but, in the 1970’s, the Lady Galt Towel line went into receivership. Dobbie Industries was able to start another line, Cambridge Towel in 1979, which was the largest North American towel manufacturer, as well as being the only Canadian one. At this point, the story of this company becomes modern day. In November, of last year (as in only a few months ago) Cambridge Towel was, sadly, forced to close it’s doors, as they lost several large contracts (including one with Walmart). Isn’t that sad that yet another Canadian and North American manufacturing plant has been shuttered?

Anyways, I started this post to share with you all these interesting pictures of some knitted sweaters, and the next thing I knew I was falling down the rabbit hole of textile mills and outsourcing manufacturing!

I hope you enjoy the pictures from this book. The book itself is in very bad condition, with the cover torn off and taped back on and the pages tattered and stained. Nevertheless, I do love old fashion books, because of the illustrations. This one came home with me from a flea market a few years ago, and I am glad to be able to share it with you today. I believe it is from the late 1940’s, as one of the models is referred to as “Miss Canada 1947”, and the silhouette and styles (as well as hair and makeup) fit in with that era as well.

A Fashion Moment with Newlands, the artyologist, front cover

A Fashion Moment with Newlands, the artyologist, cover girls

A Fashion Moment with Newlands, the artyologist, description of yarn goods

A Fashion Moment with Newlands, the artyologist, town and country sweater

A Fashion Moment with Newlands, the artyologist, dressy wool

A Fashion Moment with Newlands, the artyologist, father and son

A Fashion Moment with Newlands, the artyologist, accessories

A Fashion Moment with Newlands, the artyologist, the sweater silhouette

A Fashion Moment with Newlands, the artyologist, ski sweaters

A Fashion Moment With McCall’s Treasury of Needlecraft: Dressy Sweaters

a fashion moment with McCall's Treasury of Needlecraft, Dressy Sweaters, the artyologist

I think that it is about high time there was another peek into the McCall’s Treasury of Needlecraft, don’t you? It has been quite a while since the last edition, back in July, where I shared knitted and crocheted dresses. This time around, we are delving into “Dressy Sweaters”.

By this I mean, not your average knitwear, which is usually intended for warmth (although style is always important as well!). These knits I share with you today are all just a bit fancier- either with intricate patterns, beading or other pretty details. Some of them are not specifically intended for evening wear, but look a little bit more elegant due to how they are styled, and what they are paired with, while some of them are intended for evening wear. We don’t usually think of knitted and crocheted garments for evening, but when they are made out of more delicate materials, they are the perfect option for fancier occasions, especially when the weather begins to turn cooler.

I hope you enjoy these lovely pieces!  Which are your favourites?

beaded sweater, fashion moment with McCalls treasury of needlecraft, the artyologist

This needs to be in my wardrobe. Like, right now. This is one of the most beautiful cardigans I have ever seen, and it is definitely worthy of being worn with a bridal ensemble as shown here. Or with anything for that matter, as it would make any outfit incredible!

two-ladies, fashion moment with mccalls treasury of needlecraft the artyologist

Two outfits finished off perfectly with the addition of a belt.

fashion moment with mccall's treasury of needlcraft, dressy sweaters

You could definitely wear this beautiful jacket in place of a blazer. It looks so polished.

McCall's Treasury of Needlecraft, the artyologist, two elegant ladies

When in doubt, add a muff. And beading. And gloves. And impeccable hair. Ok, I’ll stop now.

portrait, dressy sweaters, fashion moment, mccall's treasury of needlecraft, the artyologist

Not only in love with her top, but her topper as well! Do you think it’s a beret? Or a hat with a folded up brim? It’s hard to tell!

knitwear, dressy sweaters, the artyologist, fashion moment

I’m gonna guess the lady on the right is wearing a bullet bra. . . 

dressy-sweater, the artyologist, mccalls treasury of needlecraft

What appears to be another bridal ensemble.The question we are all asking ourselves though is . . . seriously, what is with the guy in the background??

ribbon dressy sweater, the artyologist

And last, but not least, this “handsome mandarin jacket” is made of ribbon yarn. It gives an interesting texture, and also a pretty and elegant sheen, don’t you think?

A Fashion Moment With Creative Hands

A Fashion Moment with Creative Hands, the artyologist

“The Prettiest Suit in Town”

It is time for another Fashion Moment, and today I bring you Creative Hands. My dad found these books for me several years ago, and they are, hands down, my favourite sewing books.

These books were published by “Greystone”, in the late 1960’s and early 1970’s but I haven’t been able to find much else about them. They were originally published in part as “Golden Hands”, which is I think a much more interesting (hilarious?) title. Anyways, if you ever find the Creative Hands series in a thrift store or second hand shop- snap them up!

A Fashion Moment with Creative Hands, the artyologist, stripes and vests

There are twenty-two volumes which are, in their own words, “The complete knitting, dressmaking and needlecraft guide.” The books start out with basics of such a variety of skills like embroidery, sewing, knitting, crocheting, lacemaking, (and more!) and practical tips such as building a wardrobe and how to care for your garments. Also scattered throughout are the “Collectors Pieces”, which are showcases of intricate works of textile art, throughout history and current (at the time of printing). Like a school course, you start in book one, learning the beginner steps of each craft, and as you work through the books, you build upon the techniques to become proficient in all of the textile arts. I haven’t worked through the books in chronological order, as I have decided that I will never be a knitter or a crocheter, but I have picked up many invaluable techniques in the dressmaking and embroidery sections, and found ample entertainment while looking through the pictures of the some the hilarious fashions “you can make yourself”!

So, today, on the second day of fall (how fitting) I share with you, some knitwear (and crochetwear -ok never mind, that’s not even a word…) of the 1960’s and 1970’s, just in time for the cooler weather headed our way!

What do you think of these garments? Would you wear any of them? My favourite is this brown sweater with frog fastenings.

A Fashion Moment with Creative Hands, the artyologist, how to make frog closures

Make your own frog closures! And what a gorgeous (and cozy looking) sweater/coat for fall time.

A Fashion Moment with Creative Hands, the artyologist, two tan knitwear

A Fashion Moment with Creative Hands, the artyologist, blue vest

Love the scarf addition, and belt for a layered look. (And the Gibson style hair!)

A Fashion Moment with Creative Hands, the artyologist, pink and tan knitwear

Another coat/cardigan with frog closures- it must be a trend!

1965 Fashion: Terylene Goes On Holiday

1965 Fashion: Terylene Goes on Holiday, the artyologist

There are exciting sunny days to look forward to, and how easy it is to look our best in summertime when there is a wealth of gay, prettily patterned fabrics to choose from. We have selected our favourites from Cavendish’s extensive Terylene range- fabrics that wash like a dream, are easy to pack, shed their creases and need little ironing. For home dressmakers there are five patterns that make the most of Terylene’s marvellous qualities.

Today’s Fashion Moment is brought to you by this Woman and Home magazine from May 1965.

(Sorry for being terribly out of season! We don’t have sunny days ahead, but I really wanted to post these while it’s still summer, before the calendar flips from August to September, and we start to turn our thoughts to colder days. Except, of course, for my readers from the Southern hemisphere; in which case- Happy Springtime! These are right on time for you!)

1965 Fashion: Terylene Goes on Holiday, the artyologist, Woman and Home Cover

Have you ever read any vintage magazines? I found a few of these British “Woman and Home” 1960’s magazines at the thrift store a few years ago. Sometimes vintage magazines are great, and the fashion is often wonderful (or amusing if nothing else), but often the “self help” and advice is just Terrible. Yes, with a capital “T”. This magazine’s target audience, as far as I can tell, is the 30-something housewife, who is trying to keep up appearances with the neighbours, raise two neat and tidy children who dress in adorable clothes, remain fashionably attired herself, and above all keep her “youthful bloom” from fading, because if her husband starts fooling around with the secretary, who really could blame him? (But don’t worry, because with Melody hair dye, you can cover your grey hair, and keep your husband at home where he belongs.) Seriously, it is very depressing. But, then again, I find most modern “advice” columns to be pretty bad too.

Fortunately, I was not looking for advice when I picked up these magazines- I was after the 1960’s fashion columns! There are not many photo spreads, but there are enough to be interesting. (There are also some great advertisements, one of which I shared back in February!) I thought you all might like to see the fashion photos, so today I am sharing a column about the new “Terylene” fabric. Here are the rest of the magazine captions, and some lovely pictures to inspire you to 1960’s fashion greatness!

1965 Fashion: Terylene Goes on Holiday Woman and Home Magazine, the artyologist

For late afternoon wear, a “special” dress that is so appealing because of its relaxed and unruffled charm in a cool turquoise printed pique voile. (The colour is so off- it looks cerulean!)

1965 Fashion: Terylene Goes on Holiday, the artyologist, Woman and Home

For lazing in the sun, the ever popular shirtwaister brought right up to date in a dreamy lavender, pink and brown Terylene lawn, with a permanently pleated skirt and short raglan sleeves. And, an elegant yet comfortable two piece for carefree travelling in Terylene and viscose which has an easy fitting bloused top and a detachable ring collar in a toning abstract design. 

1965 Fashion: Terylene Goes on Holiday, the artyologist, Woman and Home

For the beach, a dazzling white two piece in Terylene and viscose, worn under a stunning beach shirt in filmy transparent pique voile. And, to offset a newly acquired sun-tan, a deliberately simple sheath in yellow and green printed crepe with the back revealing a deep slashed V trimmed with frills.

1965 Fashion: Terylene Goes on Holiday Woman and Home Magazine Beach Suit, the artyologist

1965 Fashion: Woman and Home, Terylene Goes on Vacation, the artyologist

And this one was not from the Terylene article, but I thought I’d include it, as it fit in nicely: Prettiest 4-ply cardigan with well-styled favourite raglan sleeves. A contrast colour picks out the focal points- delicate bands of pattern and fancy borders.

I absolutely love the first image, of the ruffled V back sundress. It would be so perfect for the sunny summer days. Which outfit here is your favourite? Would you wear any of these? And have you ever heard of Terylene before? (I hadn’t!)