Are you Ready for Fashion Revolution 2018?

fashion revolution, the artyologist

Here we are again, nearing the end of April which means that Fashion Revolution Week is almost upon us. Next week, April 23-29th is Fashion Revolution Week 2018, and I have been spending some time this week getting ready to take part in the event.

So, what exactly is Fashion Revolution Week? Well, it is a global movement which seeks to create transparency, sustainability and ethical standards within the fashion industry. The fashion industry is one with more than a few dirty secrets, and the Fashion Revolution organization works to generate awareness about the issues and injustices garment and textile workers around the world face. In their own words, “We want to unite the fashion industry and ignite a revolution to radically change the way our clothes are sourced, produced and purchased, so that what the world wears has been made in a safe, clean and fair way.

Personally I never used to think much about where my clothes came from, or who made them- they just appeared at the store as far as I knew. Who spun the threads? Who dyed the fabric? Did the people who sewed them work in safe and responsible conditions? These were not questions that crossed my mind.

I thought that sweatshops and horrific tragedies like the Triangle Shirtwaist factory fire of 1911, were a thing of the past.

Fashion Revolution Week comes once a year, and falls around April 24th, which is the anniversary of the tragic 2013 Rana Plaza factory collapse in Dhaka, Bangladesh. The Rana Plaza factory collapse, which is the largest and deadliest garment industry tragedy to date, resulted in 1,138 deaths (including both garment workers and rescuers) and injured over 2,500 people. Sadly, even though it is the largest tragedy, it was not the first to take place in recent history within the fashion industry, and it has not been the last either. There are many factories which are, quite simply, disasters waiting to happen. When word of the Rana Plaza building collapse hit the news, back in 2013, many consumers at the time, expressed outrage, claimed that the situation was terrible and shameful, and demanded transparency within the industry and improvements in the working conditions of the garment workers. But, like many other tragic news stories: people move on.

Fashion Revolution was created in order to keep the issues alive, to keep people aware of what is going on within the fashion industry, and to keep asking questions, and encouraging us, the consumers, to ask brands and retailers, “who made my clothes”?

The fashion industry is one that is not fully “automated”. Someone, somewhere in this world made the clothing on the rack at your local shop. Behind every t-shirt is a face- someone’s mother, or brother or sister; the t-shirt may have been sewn on a machine, but someone was running that machine, and feeding the fabric through it. There are an estimated, 60-70 million people worldwide who work in the garment and textile industries, and about 80% of those workers are female. Some of those workers are treated well and are paid a fair wage, but many are taken advantage of and mistreated. Fashion Revolution Week gives people an opportunity to ask questions about how are garments are being made, who made them and what conditions they made them in. And of course, the goal is to be a part of helping to create change for the lives of these workers.

So, this year, which is the 5th anniversary of the Rana Plaza collapse, there are several ways you can get involved to help to create change in the fashion industry.

The first way to be involved is to ask brands, “Who made my clothes?” You can do this by showing the label on your garment (like my picture above) and then asking the brand #whomademyclothes? You can also snap a picture of yourself holding this sign asking “Who made my clothes?” You can find the signs here. You can post your pictures to twitter, instagram or facebook. (I’ll be taking part on instagram.) Don’t forget to tag the brand in your post, so they’ll get the notification, and see your question! In 2017, the social media impact was huge, with 533 million impressions of posts using one of the Fashion Revolution hashtags during April. This was an increase of almost 250% from 2016, where there were 150 million! The movement is growing, and change is happening!

Fashion Revolution also has a template for writing a letter to a brand, in order to ask more directly, “who made my clothes”.

For other ideas on how to take part in the event this year, (last year there were over 2 million participants) there is a pdf created by Fashion Revolution, with more ideas, here. Also, check out to see if there is an event in your area, on their page here.

I am really excited for this years Fashion Revolution- because as each year passes, the event gets bigger and bigger- and even though at times it may seem like an uphill battle, I know that changes are taking place in the fashion industry, ethical fashion is becoming more and more available and some of the bigger fashion brands are starting to take transparency seriously. Little by little change is coming, and it’s so good to be a part of that, in my own small way. We can’t be responsible for the actions of others, but we can each take a bit more care in the fashion and purchasing choices that we make for ourselves. It’s so easy to snap a picture of your tag, right? I can’t wait to see what everyone is doing next week, and I hope you’ll join in the movement too!

Also, I’ve got a couple of ethical fashion posts lined up for next week, so check back!

Have you ever participated in or will you be participating this year in Fashion Revolution?

An Ode to Dying Tulips

An Ode to Tulips, the artyologist

A few weeks ago my mom brought me a bouquet of tulips, which was so incredibly lovely of her. I had been thinking of picking up a bouquet when I was at the grocery store in the morning, but when they were sold out of anything nice, I figured I would just do without. However, I didn’t have to do without, as my mom stopped at the local florist and brought me these tulips later in the day! It’s not as though bouquets of flowers are necessary, but they can make such a difference to your mood can’t they?

tea-and-tulips, the artyologist

Sadly, these didn’t last very long for some reason. Mine got a bit dry, as I left them for a few days over the weekend and the leaves started to die. I think they just weren’t the best flowers this time, though, since my sister got a bouquet as well and hers didn’t even open fully. Even though they died much too quickly, they were still lovely to have for a short time, and I decided that they were still worth documenting. There can be beauty even in fading things.

tulip bouquet detail the artyologist

tulips-horizontal, the artyologist

tulip-bouquet-the artyologist

tulips-on-dresser, the artyologist

tulip-study, the artyologist

An Easter Bonnet with a Ribbon Upon It

An Easter Bonnet with a Ribbon Upon It, The artyologist

I did not spend my Easter in the laundry room. However, I did not want to brave the cold weather for photos, so my laundry room had to serve as an impromptu photo studio for my Easter Sunday outfit this year! It actually worked surprisingly well, though, so you might just see more of this location in future posts, especially since I refuse to take any more photos out in the snow.

Anyways, regarding the outfit, which is probably what you want to hear more of, (though I could keep talking about the laundry room if you’d like. . .) I like to wear an “Easter bonnet” each year. Actually I like to wear them every other day of the year too, but on Easter it just seems more appropriate to wear your most outrageous hat, don’t you think?

An Easter Bonnet with a Ribbon Upon It, the artyologist, vintage pillbox

This navy blue tulle 1960’s pillbox with a random blue ribbon decoration, won for this year’s outfit. It is my most ridiculous hat, and it is all the better because it only cost $1 from a thrift store. (Some people might say that $1 was too much…) It was as flat as a pancake when I found it, and required steaming it back into shape, but I’m so glad I got it because it’s the most hilarious hat I’ve ever worn, it vaguely resembles a cake, and every time I wear it, I love it all the more, simply because it is so over-the-top.

I did originally want to wear a new (much less ridiculous) hat I bought last week, and a sundress, but this year Easter came early and Spring has come late and so, instead of sunshine and flowers, we were dealing with snowstorms and bitter winds. Thus, that outfit will have to wait until the weather warms up a bit more. And so for Easter Sunday, this was my “It’s still Winter out there so I am wearing this navy dress, but I have put a lace jacket over top to make it feel a bit more like Spring is on the way” outfit.

I really don’t have much else to say, so that’s all for now- I hope you all have a wonderful week!

An Easter Bonnet with a Ribbon Upon It, the artyologist, silhouette

An Easter Bonnet with a Ribbon Upon It, the artyologist, vintage style outfit

An Easter Bonnet with a Ribbon Upon It, the artyologist, pearl button detail, vintage hat

An Easter Bonnet with a Ribbon Upon It, the artyologist, vintage pillbox

What the Grahams Wore on Easter Sunday: A Fashion Moment with Canadian Home Journal 1941

What the Grahams Wore on Easter Sunday, Canadian Home Journal 1941, the artyologist

Just what will the Grahams wear for Easter Sunday? Why, I’m so glad you asked . . . because I just happen to have a three page spread showing just that!

what the grahams will wear, Canadian Home Journal 1941 the artyologist

My brother gave me this Canadian Home Journal from April of 1941, this past Christmas, and I’ve been eagerly waiting to share it with you all, because there is an entire section in the magazine featuring Singer sewing machines, and Butterick patterns! I haven’t figured out yet what I am going to wear this Easter Sunday, but any of these patterns would be delightful, don’t you think? It’s too bad I won’t be able to make any of these lovely dresses, but at least we can enjoy looking at them, right?

The article on the right page talks about how Mrs. S. Armstrong, of Montreal, wanted to have “more pretty clothes- for much less money”, and so she decided to sew them herself. However, there was just one problem- she didn’t know how to sew! But, no problem, she just went to her nearest Singer Sewing Centre, and enrolled in their Three Free Lessons. “There the obliging sewing instructress showed her how easy and simple it is to sew- and save- the Singer way.” Now Mrs. Armstrong has become “quite the expert” and “does all her own sewing- on the modern Singer electric Mr. Armstrong gave her for her birthday”. Furthermore, “the Singer Sewing Centre in your town is always ready to help you. Go there for wardrobe ideas, for advice on a sewing problem, or for “short course” lessons in dressmaking or home decorating. All these services are free!” Well, I just want to pop over my local vintage Singer Sewing Centre now, don’t you?

what-mrs-graham-taught, canadian home journal 1941, the artyologist

This dress, above, is just perfection!

striped-blouse, canadian home journal 1941, butterick 1419 and butterick 1440, the artyologist

I love this striped blouse and suit from Butterick 1440.

what-they-will-wear, canadian home journal 1941, the artyologist

Here is what Margaret, Ailsa, Dorothy, and Peg Graham will wear.

orange-dress, canadian home journal 1941, butterick 1444 and 1451, the artyologist

Dorothy likes the “high surplice neckline” of Butterick 1444 and the “wide midriff belt” of 1451, above.

wardrobe spice, canadian home journal 1941, butterick 1407 and 1453, the artyologist

Ailsa “likes the shirred pockets” in this Butterick 1407 suit. Also pictured is Butterick 1453. On the other page, we are shown how to add some “spice’ to your outfit!

wardrobe-spice, canadian home journal, the artyologist

There will be “many pleasant uses for these important additions to the Spring costumes they are planning”.

butterick dresses, canadian home journal, butterick 1462 and butterick 1160, the artyologist

Margaret likes the “saddle shoulders in both the dress and the coat of this ensemble because they give a broad shoulder line”. Broad shoulders were definitely the thing in the 40’s! Butterick 1462 includes both the coat and the dress. And Peg, on the right, likes the “slim lines of this reefer which buttons up to a high collar” Butterick 1160 and 1465.

cape, canadian home journal 1941, butterick 1456, the artyologist

And lastly, my favourite is this ensemble with Butterick 1456. I love everything about this: the cape, the handbag, the cool folded hat. . .  the officer (haha just kidding!)

Which of the patterns from this issue of Canadian Home Journal do you like the best? Don’t you wish you could still order things from old magazines and catalogues, when you browse through them? Have you ever seen an issue of Canadian Home Journal before? And, have you picked out what you are going to wear for Easter yet?