dress up

A Limited Knowledge of Alice’s Wonderland

A Limited Knowledge of Alice's Wonderland, The Artyologist

To be completely honest, I don’t really know anything about Alice in Wonderland. I have never read any of the books by Lewis Carroll, I only watched the Disney movie once when I was a child, (and was promptly scared by it) and have never watched any of the newer versions for the same reason. This quote, pretty much sums up my knowledge of the story:

Alice laughed. “There’s no use trying,” she said. “one can’t believe impossible things.”

“I daresay you haven’t had much practice,” said the Queen. “When I was your age, I always did it for half-an-hour a day. Why, sometimes I’ve believed as many as six impossible things before breakfast.”

A Limited Knowledge of Alice's Wonderland, The Artyologist

However, despite the fact that I don’t really know anything about the story, I have seen several Alice in Wonderland inspired photo shoots before, and they have always been rather fun and surreal, so I thought it would be fun to do one myself, and I even had a vaguely Alice inspired outfit to wear. (And my sister had a fun saturated setting on her camera that she was wanting to try out.) I actually had to Google “Alice in Wonderland” to see what it all entailed, before I could do the photos. (I also learned, via that search and from snippets of my memory, that the story involves a tea party, talking flowers, a potion and a rabbit with a clock.)

I decided that this most recent sewing project would be a good “Alice” inspired outfit to wear. This is another skirt made with the same technique as my dutch wax, black floral, and recycled bed sheet skirts. (Definitely a tried and true pattern!) I find them to be so versatile for summer, that I decided to make another out of a remnant of denim I’ve had for a few years. I used to have a dress made out of this cute fabric, when I was 12, and the remnant leftover from that dress was so small, I could never squeeze enough fabric out of it to make anything. However a gathered skirt was the perfect choice. There was just enough fabric to get a gathered skirt, suspenders, waistband and a button placket up the front instead of a zipper this time. (Just so they wouldn’t all look exactly the same!) There was only about a 10″ x 6″ square of material left over. Definitely a stash busting project!

With the outfit ready, I added in a potion bottle necklace, a miniature teapot tchotchke, a clock, an oversized teacup, and “talking” pansies. So, here is the result of my limited knowledge of Alice’s Wonderland.

Outfit Details:

Skirt: Sewn by me

Peasant Blouse T-Shirt: Owned it for years

Shoes: Miz Mooz, This style is no longer available, but they have similar styles.

Bottle Necklace: Thrifted

Headband: Handmade, bought from a local boutique

A Limited Knowledge of Alice's Wonderland, The Artyologist

A Limited Knowledge of Alice's Wonderland, The Artyologist

A Limited Knowledge of Alice's Wonderland, The Artyologist

A Limited Knowledge of Alice's Wonderland, The Artyologist

A Limited Knowledge of Alice's Wonderland, The Artyologist

1970’s Flower Child

1970's Flower Child, The Artyologist

I’ve already mentioned before how my sister Sarah and I love to dress up in costume and have photo shoots. These pictures are from earlier this spring, when an area of our yard was just covered in bright yellow dandelions. (Thus I thought that I should post these pictures before autumn arrives!) Dandelions are such a love/hate, as they are so pretty and bright and cheery, and yet they are such a menace in your garden! We decided to make the best of the weed situation, though, and do a photo shoot, as the flowers were just begging to be used as a backdrop for photos. We decided that the 1970’s was a perfect inspiration, as it would give that “flower child” vibe the era is so famous for.

I don’t usually dress in the style of the 1970’s although some of my clothes definitely could be styled that way, and some of my vintage is 1970’s, while I often style it to look even older. It’s interesting how pieces of clothing can be styled one way or another to create a completely different look each time. It all lies in the accessories. These are the same pants that I styled to look 1910’s/20’s here, and I have worn them many times this summer, as they are extremely comfortable and cool for hot weather.

These outfits turned out a bit more “modern” than the 1970’s probably would’ve been, but they are definitely inspired by the era. I love how the photos turned out; the only problem with them is that the sun was so bright and hot that day, that we almost got heat stroke! Oh well, the sacrifices we make, right? 😉

Outfit Details: 

Shirt (on me): Thrifted

Tunic Shirt (on her): Thrifted

Harem Pants (on me): From a local store, imported from Thailand

Hat: Owned for years

Scarf: Vintage, handed down from my Gramma

Jewelry: All vintage, thrifted, or as a gift

Shoes (on me): Franco Sarto, from a few years ago

Shoes (on her): Toms, this colour not available anymore, but here they are in turquoise!

1970's flower child photoshoot, the artyologist

1970's flower child the artyologist

70's flower child the artyologist

Sarah does the 70’s so well she could be the poster child for the era.

1970's flower child photoshoot the artyologist

in the grass 1970's photo shoot the artyologist

1970's photoshoot the artyologist

She looks like an advertisement for Free People. 🙂

1970's flower child photoshoot the artyologist

1970's Flower Child the artyologist

Urban Camouflage in My New Hell Bunny Trench Coat

Urban Camouflage in My New Hell Bunny Trench Coat, the artyologist

Do you remember back in June when I visited Rowena, the Retro Glam clothing store in Edmonton? Well, today I am excited to share with you the other item that I purchased that day: my brand new Hell Bunny Trench Coat!

I have been looking for a new rain coat for a long time. There wasn’t really anything wrong with my old cream trench coat, which I have had for six years now. It was in great shape, which is surprising considering that it was a Smart Set coat I got second hand, but sometimes I found that the fitted style was hard to layer over full 50’s style skirts, and- let’s be honest- I am fickle and easily bored with my closet and I was really ready for a change. However, do you know how hard it is to find a plain old, classic style, trench coat that is not $3000.00, or “modernized”, or covered in ruffles, or patterned in polka dots, or exactly like the one I already had? Not that I dislike polka dots, it’s just that I have an abundance of patterns in my wardrobe, and I need some basics. And, it seems like the last few seasons have been filled with every kind of rain coat under the sun- except for a basic coat with a classic, retro feel. I searched the thrift stores for a vintage one, with no luck, and even ended up picking up a London Fog coat from the 80’s, which had working buttons and flaps (in short a real trench coat). It turned out to be too long and boxy though, and I was too intimidated to try and refashion it, (Maybe I’ll be brave enough to do that someday!) so off it went to the thrift store again. (I should add at this point that I rarely ever buy clothes online, as I have had some bad experiences before, and I prefer to try on before I buy. Especially as in Canada, we don’t usually get free shipping or returns.)

In short, I was despairing of ever finding a coat.

Enter, the “Bacall” Hell Bunny trench coat (which I have no doubt Lauren Bacall, whom I assume it is named for, would not hesitate to wear, as it is that glamorous). It is pretty much all of my raincoat dreams come true.

My New Hell Bunny Trench Coat, the artyologist

When I was shopping in Rowena, we had been in the store for almost an hour, I had picked out a dress to buy, and as I was heading to the till, we realized that we only had a few minutes left on our parking meter. Then, I saw a rack of coats, and had to take a quick detour to look through them. When I saw this trench coat, I didn’t hesitate for a second to try it on, even though I knew we were in a hurry to leave. I first tried the medium, but it was a bit too big. They didn’t have any other sizes out front, but they had more in the back, so the sales girl went to check. In the meantime, the clock was ticking, and it was a race against time! She found the coat and brought it, still in the bag. I quickly tried on the coat to find that it fit, bought it and the dress, and we rushed out the door and made it to the vehicle with less than a minute to spare on the meter! It was the fastest purchase I have ever made in my life, and I usually need a lot of time to think my purchases through, but I have absolutely no regrets about buying this coat.

So, what do I love about it?

  • It is the perfect length to wear over knee length skirts, and is full enough to accommodate a petticoat, if I choose to wear one.
  • It has a tie belt, rather than a belt with a buckle- that is just a personal preference.
  • The lapel collar has a button hole so it can be buttoned across to keep out the wind and rain, like real trench coats do. And the separate back yoke gives the classic trench coat silhouette.
  • The sateen finish on the fabric makes the coat a bit dressier (especially compared to my last coat).
  • And, the best part: you can pop the collar up and pretend that you are a lady spy from the 1950’s. (While taking pictures in front of a mural that is right beside an intersection, so everyone driving by can stop and see you and wonder what on earth you are doing. But the pictures were worth it, and this coat really is perfect for blending into the black and white mural. Which makes it great for pretending that I am a spy.)

Pretending to be a spy, hell bunny bacall trench coat, the artyologist

What don’t I like about the coat?

  • It is only available in black. (And, I looked on their site, it doesn’t appear to be available from them at all anymore, although many retailers are still carrying it. I’m not sure if they have discontinued it or not?) Black is classic, but I own a lot of brown, which, although not impossible to pair with black, takes more thought and effort to pass off well. It is simply not as effortless, for my personal wardrobe, as a khaki or tan coat would be. That being said, the black is lovely, and I will get a lot of wear out of it.
  • The other thing I don’t like, is that the buttons stop just past the waist, and the skirt of the coat is liable to blow open in the wind and rain. You will get wet if the wind catches it (voice of experience). I am not sure why they didn’t add a couple more rows of buttons, as that would have solved the problem, and made this coat so much better for blustery, windy weather.
  • It is, as far as I know, not fair trade. The coat is made in China, and I don’t know what that entails. I did struggle with my decision to purchase this coat, as it goes against my goals for an ethical wardrobe, since I don’t know where/how it was made. More transparency in their manufacturing process would be good.
what I don't like, hell bunny trench coat, the artyologist

Here you can see how far the coat opens, which can catch in the wind, resulting in… you getting wet.

The only regret that I do have, which is not Hell Bunny’s fault in the least, is that I was so excited to get a new coat, that I got rid of my old one a tad hastily. This coat is just not suitable for all situations and colour schemes, and I kind of miss my old one. Oh well, that just means that I am on the hunt for another coat- this time a classic khaki one. It’ll probably only take me another 6 years. 😉

Trench Coat: Hell Bunny Trench Coat, “Bacall”

Bue Silk Scarf: Ten Thousand Villages

Navy Shoes: Vintage Naturalizer, thrifted

Sunglasses: bought online several years ago

Purse: Bought in England from a consignment shop

My New Hell Bunny Trench Coat, the artyologist

Isn’t this a great mural?

urban camouflage in my new hell bunny trench coat, the artyologist

urban camouflage in my new hell bunny trench coat, the artyologist

retro sunglasses, in my new trench coat, the artyologist

being a moviestar in my new hell bunny trench coat the artyologist

urban camouflage in the hell bunny bacall trench coat, the artyologist

A 1950’s Mode En France Inspired Shoot

A 1950's Mode en France Inspired Shoot The Artyologist

A few years ago I found this little video, Mode en France on Youtube, which goes through the history of European fashion from the end of the Victorian Era, up until the 1980’s. (Click over and watch it, as it is pretty great. I can’t understand a word of French, but fortunately fashion is universal!) After watching it, I wanted to do a photoshoot with my sister and best friend, of the fashions featured in the video- only since I do not have video talents, I was going to do photos instead. Well, the years have gone by, and we’ve still not managed to do a complete overview of all the eras, but we have done a few separate ones. We once dressed up in the styles of the 1940’s (and when I say “dressed up” I mean they dressed up, considering that all the clothes came from my closet!), another time was the Victorian era, and once we dressed up in assorted wedding dresses, which was rather fun.

So, when my friend Chantelle came for a visit last month, one of the things we made sure to do, was another photoshoot. This time, we chose the 1950’s, and donned full skirts, petticoats, hats and gloves. It was rather fun to put all the pieces of the outfit together, as I don’t usually do a whole hat and glove ensemble. I love putting together a period perfect ensemble, but I rarely wear it as such.

Here are the pictures we ended up with. It was a fun time spent together, posing as though we were supermodels, but mostly giggling and being generally silly. I am glad to have these pictures, some of which turned out great- others not so much, but the memories of the afternoon are what I will remember the most. 🙂

Do you ever “dress to the nines” just for fun? Have you ever done a photoshoot with your friends?

(The image above is our Prada sunglasses advertisement, don’t you think? I was testing out the height of the tripod, and it turned out it was a bit off, so the top of my head is cut out of the frame, but nevertheless- it is a hilariously serious looking picture and I love it!)

A 1950's Mode en France Inspired Shoot The Artyologist

A 1950's inpsired shoot the Artyologist

We nailed the model poses in this one 😉

A 1950's inpsired shoot the Artyologist

A 1950's inpsired shoot the Artyologist

A 1950's inpsired shoot the Artyologist