fashion history

A New Look

new-look-feature

One of my favourite iconic vintage garments, is the Bar Suit by Christian Dior, from the 1947 collection. After the austerity of WWII, Dior’s designs must have been a breath of fresh air to women- although it is interesting, if you read about the time period, that not everyone thought that the new styles were a good change!

I’ve always loved this silhouette; maybe because it’s one that really works for me. I love so many of Dior’s designs from the late 1940’s through the 1950’s- the so called “New Look” of the era. Interestingly, the image below, often cited as from the 1947 collection, is actually an image taken in 1957 of a newer version of the suit. It has a few changes and, while the look is very similar, it is a bit looser than the 1947 version, which was more tailored, featured a padded hip to accentuate the waist, and a smoother line on the jacket without the peplum flare. Personally, I like the 1957 version more, and I love this image, so I decided to try and recreate it myself.

new-look-then-and-now

I’m not very good at replicating the pose, as it turns out. . . I guess this one won’t be going into the #myvintagecover annals!

As to the title of this post – yes I was alluding to that New Look, as my outfit was definitely inspired by the Bar Suit, but I was also referring to the fact that I got a new haircut, so it’s a bit of a “New Look” for me too! You probably can’t tell in these photos, because of the hat, but I got the sides trimmed (actually shaved) quite short and then left the top long and layered. I had a cut similar to this a few years ago, and it was the best cut I have ever gotten. This one was with a new hairdresser, and although I do really like it, there are a few tweaks that I will get her to do next time to make it perfect. It’s so hard to get a perfect haircut, isn’t it? I personally find it so hard to communicate what my vision is- when their vision might be quite different from my own!

walking-away-and-yellow-trees

Back to this outfit, though, I wore the same ensemble back in the spring, but never got photos. As soon as the weather started cooling off enough to wear wool, though, I decided to wear it again- and this time get photographs! The photographs were taken the day after I wore this outfit, and I didn’t actually wear the hat when I went out, because it was raining and windy- and I have no hair to pin the hat too! So, the hat is purely for styling purposes ūüėČ

new-look,-arch-of-trees

We got snow quite early this year (September 15!), and even though it melted away again, it’s been quite cold. I was a wimp and didn’t go and get very many photos of the fall leaves. . . these are actually the only ones! But, there are still some trees with leaves on them, so maybe I can get some more this weekend.

Well, I’m off to my family’s place for the weekend . . . to all of my fellow Canadians: I hope you have a lovely Thanksgiving!

Did you know that there were two Bar Suits made? (I learned that just recently!) Have you ever tried to recreate an iconic vintage outfit or design? And have you had a nice Fall where you live?

archway-and-portrait

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twirling-and-sidewalk-of-leaves

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walking-through-leaves

Vintage Covers: Vogue April 1963, A Chic Accessory

Vintage Covers: Vogue April 1963, the artyologist

What is more chic for Summer than the classic straw hat? With a rounded brim and soft golden colour, this piece is perfect for the season, no matter where you will be.

Vintage Covers: Vogue April 1963

So, it is already August 8th and I still never announced whether #myvintagecover is happening again this year. It is.

You can read here for more info (it’s exactly the same as last year: just insert 2018 instead of 2017). Oh and check out the instagram hashtag too- there are already lots of amazing posts. It’s been lovely seeing people join in! I was planning to only do one cover this year, because I wasn’t sure if I would have enough time to do another, but this one went together relatively quickly, so maybe I will get around to doing another one after all? Do you plan to join in and recreate a cover?

What the Grahams Wore on Easter Sunday: A Fashion Moment with Canadian Home Journal 1941

What the Grahams Wore on Easter Sunday, Canadian Home Journal 1941, the artyologist

Just what will the Grahams wear for Easter Sunday? Why, I’m so glad you asked . . . because I just happen to have a three page spread showing just that!

what the grahams will wear, Canadian Home Journal 1941 the artyologist

My brother gave me this Canadian Home Journal from April of 1941, this past Christmas, and I’ve been eagerly waiting to share it with you all, because there is an entire section in the magazine featuring Singer sewing machines, and Butterick patterns! I haven’t figured out yet what I am going to wear this Easter Sunday, but any of these patterns would be delightful, don’t you think? It’s too bad I won’t be able to make any of these lovely dresses, but at least we can enjoy looking at them, right?

The article on the right page talks about how Mrs. S. Armstrong, of Montreal, wanted to have “more pretty clothes- for much less money”, and so she decided to sew them herself. However, there was just one problem- she didn’t know how to sew! But, no problem, she just went to her nearest Singer Sewing Centre, and enrolled in their Three Free Lessons. “There the obliging sewing instructress showed her how easy and simple it is to sew- and save- the Singer way.” Now Mrs. Armstrong has become “quite the expert” and “does all her own sewing- on the modern Singer electric Mr. Armstrong gave her for her birthday”. Furthermore, “the Singer Sewing Centre in your town is always ready to help you. Go there for wardrobe ideas, for advice on a sewing problem, or for “short course” lessons in dressmaking or home decorating. All these services are free!” Well, I just want to pop over my local vintage Singer Sewing Centre now, don’t you?

what-mrs-graham-taught, canadian home journal 1941, the artyologist

This dress, above, is just perfection!

striped-blouse, canadian home journal 1941, butterick 1419 and butterick 1440, the artyologist

I love this striped blouse and suit from Butterick 1440.

what-they-will-wear, canadian home journal 1941, the artyologist

Here is what Margaret, Ailsa, Dorothy, and Peg Graham will wear.

orange-dress, canadian home journal 1941, butterick 1444 and 1451, the artyologist

Dorothy likes the “high surplice neckline” of Butterick 1444 and the “wide midriff belt” of 1451, above.

wardrobe spice, canadian home journal 1941, butterick 1407 and 1453, the artyologist

Ailsa “likes the shirred pockets” in this Butterick 1407 suit. Also pictured is Butterick 1453. On the other page, we are shown how to add some “spice’ to your outfit!

wardrobe-spice, canadian home journal, the artyologist

There will be “many pleasant uses for these important additions to the Spring costumes they are planning”.

butterick dresses, canadian home journal, butterick 1462 and butterick 1160, the artyologist

Margaret likes the “saddle shoulders in both the dress and the coat of this ensemble because they give a broad shoulder line”. Broad shoulders were definitely the thing in the 40’s! Butterick 1462 includes both the coat and the dress. And Peg, on the right, likes the “slim lines of this reefer which buttons up to a high collar” Butterick 1160 and 1465.

cape, canadian home journal 1941, butterick 1456, the artyologist

And lastly, my favourite is this ensemble with Butterick 1456. I love everything about this: the cape, the handbag, the cool folded hat. . .  the officer (haha just kidding!)

Which of the patterns from this issue of Canadian Home Journal do you like the best? Don’t you wish you could still order things from old magazines and catalogues, when you browse through them? Have you ever seen an issue of Canadian Home Journal before? And, have you picked out what you are going to wear for Easter yet?

Vintage Covers: Vogue, May 1952, Summer Blues

Vintage Vogue: Summer Blues, the artyologist

Blue is the colour of the season. A crisp, tailored buttoned dress is both classic and stylish, especially when accented with a pale blue platter hat and earrings. A swipe of bright blue eyeshadow, lightens the entire look, making it so very fresh and of-the-moment. Pair these summer blues with a simple black patent purse and gloves for a look that is instantly elegant. While the summer may be nearly spent, this ensemble is most certainly not.

Here is the first cover I am sharing this month for My Vintage Cover. Depending on how things go, I will attempt to do another (who knows, maybe I will be ambitious and share one a week. . . ) Anyways, I was planning on sharing this cover next week, but after a drama where I lost the flash drive that the edited picture was on, (I found it exactly where it should have been after two days of looking. Yes, I did look in that drawer, it was just between some papers!) and then getting a sinus cold this week which prevented me from doing any other blog post for today, I have decided to share the photos today. (Just in case there was anything else going to go wrong and prevent me!)

I was originally going to do a completely different cover, because I don’t have a blue hat, but then I decided to try photoshopping one of my white hats blue. While I wouldn’t say that it looks very realistic, it’s OK, because I do think it has that distinctive hand-tinted look of old photographs. And then, after seeing Tanith’s great cover a few days ago, I decided to add text in the same fonts to make mine look more like the¬†actual vintage Vogue cover. So there you have it. It was fun to try and recreate a cover with all the details, for a change.

I hope you are enjoying seeing the vintage covers so far. There aren’t very many participants so far, but to see the ones people have done already, you can check out the Instagram tag¬†here.

vintage vogue cover, may 1952 vogue cover, summer blues