vintage fashion moments

all posts that feature vintage fashion magazines, books and other vintage fashion images

My Vintage Cover Begins Today!

Happy First Day of August- and on that note- also the first day of the My Vintage Cover challenge!

I can’t believe that August is already here (really, where did July go?!) but I am so excited that My Vintage Cover is starting. To get you in the mood, here are some covers I have come across in my image searches, which I think might just be “easy” to replicate. And, if you have no idea what I am talking about, you can read all of the details here or scroll to the end of this post, for an abbreviated version of events!

This cover basically relies on a large amount of flowers. And they could be any flowers too- it’s the impact and vast quantity that makes this cover recognizable.

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Such an artistic and striking pose. Do you have a large hat? You could probably recreate this one!

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This one relies mainly on the blue makeup, a turned up collar and a simple hat.

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Blue eyeshadow and a beehive. If you do any of these two things, you are halfway there to recreating a look from the 60’s!

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This iconic cover would actually be really great to recreate, because it is black and white and you wouldn’t need to worry about colour matching your clothing! It’s all about the silhouette.

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Those of you with bakelite collections could probably pull this one off fairly easily. I thought about doing this one, but I don’t own any colourful bracelets!

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Some covers rely mainly on the creative makeup, like this one.

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Again, I think that this one could be easy to recreate, as long as you have a platter hat. It mostly relies on the pose.

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Another cover with striking makeup and hair, this time from the 70’s. You don’t have to pick a really old cover to recreate.

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A relatively simple cover with not too many exotic items or difficult poses.

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Recreating an illustration could be kind of fun. This one from the 1920’s features a relatively simple outfit- simple compared to most of the fantastical covers of the era!

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Two very similar covers, one from the 30’s and one from the 50’s, which consist mainly of swathing ones self in a fur.

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This cover from the 1980’s had Grace Coddington as creative director, and it is so simple yet striking.image source

Again this relies heavily on the makeup and hair. I think that my sister and I are going to try this one- she’ll do the makeup, and I’ll be the model!

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This one relies completely on the 50’s makeup. This is one of my favourite covers because it’s so artistic.

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Got a wicker basket? You can do this! 😉 haha!

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If you just happen to have a red ballgown, tall gloves and a fan lying around, recreate this one now because I want to see it.

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Do you have a bird? (I don’t even know what bird that is) If you do, then please feel free to recreate this one.

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Do you have access to a butterfly sanctuary? If so, then this might be a good one for you to recreate. 😉

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Well, I hope that these covers give you some inspiration and ideas- especially the last three 🙂 Tanith has also been sharing some covers, so if none of these seem to fit, hop over and check her post out. And if you’d like to see the covers I have done in the past, you can find them here.

Even if you aren’t planning on taking part in the My Vintage Cover challenge- I hope you enjoyed seeing all these great magazine covers!

Again, here is the condensed version of the My Vintage Cover challenge, being hosted by Tanith and I.

-Running August 1- 31, 2017.

-This is a non-competitive event; we just want people to have fun! 

-Tag your recreations with #myvintagecover on Instagram or post them on your blog.

-We may post a few “round-ups” depending on how many people participate

-You can recreate a vintage magazine cover (such as Vogue, Harper’s Bazaar or McCall’s) or an editorial vintage fashion image. Images with distinctive poses, or styles that are iconic to a specific era are great options.

-Repost & share your inspiration image, or link to it, so everyone can compare the recreations and originals

-Recreate as many images as you would like! There is no limit!

A Fashion Moment with Creative Hands: Lilac

A Fashion Moment with Creative Hands: Lilac, long dress

Psychedelic 70’s 

Back when the lilac hedges were in bloom (three weeks ago) I decided that it was time to do another fashion moment with my Creative Hands books, and this time to do a lilac theme. Lilac is not a colour usually associated with the 1970’s, so I extended my palette to any purple, and pink as well. Surprisingly there were a fair amount of pastel shades, including some lovely ensembles in pinks and purples, and some more questionable ones too. Sometimes you just have to wonder what they were thinking. But then I think that all the time nowadays too. 😉

I am not particularly drawn to purples and pinks myself. Though I like them in nature, (I love lilacs!) they don’t find their way very often into my wardrobe or decorating. I do have a few pieces that have pinks in them (such as floral prints) but I have no purple pieces. The only items I have had that are purple have since made their way out of my wardrobe. Do you find that you like certain colours in nature, but are not drawn to them in other places? Anyways, here are some lovely purple and pink vintage inspirations for you today!

A Fashion Moment with Creative Hands: Lilac, fashion illustrations

Aren’t these great illustrations? They outline some ways here to add knitting to your dressmaking pieces, such as adding collars and sleeves, or piecing a knitted bodice to a skirt to make a dress. 

A Fashion Moment with Creative Hands: Lilac, pink and kaftan dress

A Fashion Moment with Creative Hands: Lilac, dress with petticoat

I love the pattern of the fabric in this dress! Isn’t it crazy, but super fun? That is a separate petticoat too. It’s rather a nice idea to have matching petticoats, as that way you don’t have to worry about it showing. 

A Fashion Moment with Creative Hands: Lilac, coats

A classic coat never goes out of style. Though how you style it might. . . 

A Fashion Moment with Creative Hands: Lilac, pink sweater set

A Fashion Moment with Creative Hands: Lilac, knitwear

Nothing like a backless knitted evening gown in angora paired with silver shoes . . . 

A Fashion Moment with Creative Hands: Lilac, knitwear and skirt

I really like the simplicity and subtlety of that pink plaid skirt. I could totally add that to my wardrobe. 

A Fashion Moment with Creative Hands: Lilac, baby outfit

I couldn’t resist including this adorable baby set! 

Which of these outfits or pieces is your favourite? Are you drawn to lilacs and pinks and pastel shades? Would you be tempted to add any of these outfits to your wardrobe?

A St. Patrick’s Day Fashion Moment With Creative Hands

St. Patricks Day Fashion Moment Creative Hands, green collectors piece, fairytale, the artyologist

A fashion moment with Creative Hands is long overdue, and in this case, a St. Patrick’s Day fashion moment means, of course, all shades of green. Not that a celebration of St. Patrick’s Day is only about wearing green, but in the realm of fashion it sure is 🙂

Apparently green was not as popular a colour in the 1970’s as I thought it would be. When I started looking through my books, I thought I would find an abundance of olives, but rather I found plenty of tan, harvest gold, blue and cream, with very few images of green sprinkled throughout. These pictures I am sharing here today are the sum of all twenty-one volumes. (Minus one picture of a creepy looking man in a quilted vest!) As with most fashion images from the 1970’s, there are plenty that I would not hesitate to add to my wardrobe today. . . and plenty I would steer clear of too! I hope you enjoy these pictures, and that they put you in the mood for St. Patrick’s Day this Friday!

The fairytale influences were very strong this past season- and I think that they will be with us for a while yet. The dress at the beginning of the post is a beautiful example of a medieval and fairytale inspired garment. I would add this to my wardrobe in a second!

St. Patricks Day Fashion Moment Creative Hands, green collectors coat, the artyologist

This is another “Collector’s Piece”, which is a section in the books where they showcase textile designers projects. Can you imagine the work that went into this coat? So amazing!

St. Patricks Day Fashion Moment Creative Hands, maternity dress, the artyologist

This one looks better in the illustration than in real life, I think, although it’s hard to tell because she is sitting down (and obviously wanting that guy to Leave Her Alone, don’t you think?)

St. Patricks Day Fashion Moment Creative Hands, green tulip skirt, the artyologist

Not only is this an absolutely lovely skirt, and the entire ensemble is perfect for Spring- but let’s also take a moment to appreciate those shoes. Seriously- those shoes!!!

St. Patricks Day Fashion Moment Creative Hands, mint and green pantsuit, the artyologist

You knew that the pantsuit was coming, didn’t you?

St. Patricks Day Fashion Moment Creative Hands, girl's dress, the artyologist

So cute!

St. Patricks Day Fashion Moment Creative Hands, knitted vest, the artyologist

St. Patricks Day Fashion Moment Creative Hands, green pleated dress, the artyologist

Such a classic style of dress- I can see this masquerading very well as the 1940’s with a couple of tweaks- mainly fabric choice and a less pointed collar.

St. Patricks Day Fashion Moment Creative Hands, classic green wool coat, the artyologist

A classic coat never goes out of style. Raise your hand if you want the tapestry coat on the right!

St. Patricks Day Fashion Moment Creative Hands, green pants and smocking, the artyologist

It wouldn’t be the 1970’s without some smocking and flared pants!

St. Patricks Day Fashion Moment Creative Hands, green fortrel dress with collar, the artyologist

And, lastly, this is a really nice green ensemble. I kind of think that fabric might be Fortrel, in which case that is too bad as that stuff is nasty, but I’m not sure if it is. What do you think the fabric looks like? 

Which image is your favourite? Would you add any of these pieces to your wardrobe, given the chance? Do you plan on wearing green on Friday, for St. Patrick’s Day?

A Fashion Moment With Newlands’ Knitting

A Fashion Moment with Newlands, the artyologist

With the advent of a New Year, in the Northern Hemisphere, we find ourselves smack dab in the middle of winter. I think that this is the perfect time to share some more vintage knitwear, don’t you think? It is the season for cardigans and sweaters, after all, and I haven’t shared any for quite a while. The last time was. . . at the beginning of November, so I would definitely say we are overdue for another instalment of A Fashion Moment. Today our Fashion Moment is with Newlands.

A Fashion Moment with Newlands, the artyologist, textile mill

Who was Newlands? Well, Newlands & Co. Limited was a textile mill located in Galt (now Cambridge), Ontario, Canada. It was established in 1884, and in 1916 was merged with the Galt Robe Company to become Stauffer-Dobbie Ltd. It was a major Galt textile manufacturer of the time. At this point, the history is a bit fuzzy, but somewhere along the way, their textile division started a line called “Lady Galt” which made towels, draperies, bed linens and yarn goods. Lady Galt was available from the 1930’s to the 1970’s, as I can find some advertisements, but I don’t know exactly when they started. At some point they began to make mainly towels but, in the 1970’s, the Lady Galt Towel line went into receivership. Dobbie Industries was able to start another line, Cambridge Towel in 1979, which was the largest North American towel manufacturer, as well as being the only Canadian one. At this point, the story of this company becomes modern day. In November, of last year (as in only a few months ago) Cambridge Towel was, sadly, forced to close it’s doors, as they lost several large contracts (including one with Walmart). Isn’t that sad that yet another Canadian and North American manufacturing plant has been shuttered?

Anyways, I started this post to share with you all these interesting pictures of some knitted sweaters, and the next thing I knew I was falling down the rabbit hole of textile mills and outsourcing manufacturing!

I hope you enjoy the pictures from this book. The book itself is in very bad condition, with the cover torn off and taped back on and the pages tattered and stained. Nevertheless, I do love old fashion books, because of the illustrations. This one came home with me from a flea market a few years ago, and I am glad to be able to share it with you today. I believe it is from the late 1940’s, as one of the models is referred to as “Miss Canada 1947”, and the silhouette and styles (as well as hair and makeup) fit in with that era as well.

A Fashion Moment with Newlands, the artyologist, front cover

A Fashion Moment with Newlands, the artyologist, cover girls

A Fashion Moment with Newlands, the artyologist, description of yarn goods

A Fashion Moment with Newlands, the artyologist, town and country sweater

A Fashion Moment with Newlands, the artyologist, dressy wool

A Fashion Moment with Newlands, the artyologist, father and son

A Fashion Moment with Newlands, the artyologist, accessories

A Fashion Moment with Newlands, the artyologist, the sweater silhouette

A Fashion Moment with Newlands, the artyologist, ski sweaters

A Fashion Moment With McCall’s Treasury of Needlecraft: Dressy Sweaters

a fashion moment with McCall's Treasury of Needlecraft, Dressy Sweaters, the artyologist

I think that it is about high time there was another peek into the McCall’s Treasury of Needlecraft, don’t you? It has been quite a while since the last edition, back in July, where I shared knitted and crocheted dresses. This time around, we are delving into “Dressy Sweaters”.

By this I mean, not your average knitwear, which is usually intended for warmth (although style is always important as well!). These knits I share with you today are all just a bit fancier- either with intricate patterns, beading or other pretty details. Some of them are not specifically intended for evening wear, but look a little bit more elegant due to how they are styled, and what they are paired with, while some of them are intended for evening wear. We don’t usually think of knitted and crocheted garments for evening, but when they are made out of more delicate materials, they are the perfect option for fancier occasions, especially when the weather begins to turn cooler.

I hope you enjoy these lovely pieces!  Which are your favourites?

beaded sweater, fashion moment with McCalls treasury of needlecraft, the artyologist

This needs to be in my wardrobe. Like, right now. This is one of the most beautiful cardigans I have ever seen, and it is definitely worthy of being worn with a bridal ensemble as shown here. Or with anything for that matter, as it would make any outfit incredible!

two-ladies, fashion moment with mccalls treasury of needlecraft the artyologist

Two outfits finished off perfectly with the addition of a belt.

fashion moment with mccall's treasury of needlcraft, dressy sweaters

You could definitely wear this beautiful jacket in place of a blazer. It looks so polished.

McCall's Treasury of Needlecraft, the artyologist, two elegant ladies

When in doubt, add a muff. And beading. And gloves. And impeccable hair. Ok, I’ll stop now.

portrait, dressy sweaters, fashion moment, mccall's treasury of needlecraft, the artyologist

Not only in love with her top, but her topper as well! Do you think it’s a beret? Or a hat with a folded up brim? It’s hard to tell!

knitwear, dressy sweaters, the artyologist, fashion moment

I’m gonna guess the lady on the right is wearing a bullet bra. . . 

dressy-sweater, the artyologist, mccalls treasury of needlecraft

What appears to be another bridal ensemble.The question we are all asking ourselves though is . . . seriously, what is with the guy in the background??

ribbon dressy sweater, the artyologist

And last, but not least, this “handsome mandarin jacket” is made of ribbon yarn. It gives an interesting texture, and also a pretty and elegant sheen, don’t you think?