Search Results for: me made may

Outfit: What Do You Wear With Weather Like This?

What to wear with weather like this, main image, the artyologist

Ok, I am going to be that person, and talk about the weather. But really, it has been a strange, strange year weather-wise! This fall, for example, we got snow on October 8, which then lasted for two weeks, taking all of our fall colour with it. Then the temperatures rose and the snow melted tricking us into thinking that it was springtime and we should pull out all the summer clothing again! Except for the fact that the calendar clearly told us it was October. Then, it got cold again, but there was no snow, and no fall leaves left either. So we’ve been living with the bare trees, and the brown grass for the last few weeks. But, now it’s snowing again, and I am sure that winter is here to stay this time. That’s OK though with me because, of course, my main concern when it comes to weather, as boring as it may be, is what to wear.

When the weather is chilly, but it doesn’t really feel like fall time, and it doesn’t really feel like winter time, what do you wear? I was ready to start wearing my more winter appropriate clothing, but I didn’t want to hurry into the season either. So, I have been trying to balance the two seasons, and coming up with combinations like this one I wore last week.

My trench coat kept me warm enough, because as dreary as it looks in these pictures, it wasn’t actually that cold out. And the wool beret and my favourite wool skirt made this outfit look wintry enough (OK, you caught me. I say everything is my favourite. But that’s just because I couldn’t choose a favourite anything if I tried…) Going with such a monochromatic, non-patterned outfit was really a change from the norm for me as well, and allowed me to use some of the accessories I have, that never seem to go with anything, like this scarf and clutch. The scarf added a nice jolt of colour, because, while I absolutely love mint, I have hardly anything in my wardrobe to wear this scarf with, thus, it doesn’t get worn as often as it deserves to be!

wool-skirt, what katie did polka dot tights, the artyologist

The other item I was glad to wear, is this hilarious/amazing vintage clutch. I picked this up in the summer, and this was it’s debut! I found this one in a thrift store, and it is covered with feathers, and then completely wrapped with clear plastic. There is a crack in the plastic on the back, but I don’t mind too much. I can’t really decide if the clutch is cool, or just plain weird, though. What do you think? It is the stupidest thing to carry though, as it is so narrow, it can only hold my phone, a lipstick, and some loose change. My wallet doesn’t even fit in it, but that’s a clutch for you: fun, but not very functional. (Maybe if I just schlepped less stuff around with me . . . )

Anyways, this outfit worked out pretty well for a transitional kind of outfit. I always find the changing seasons a bit difficult to dress for. Now that we have snow again, and the temperatures have dropped, I’ve started pulling out my winter coats, I guess I won’t have to really worry about that until Spring.

How about you- do you find it easy, or difficult to dress for the changing seasons? Does it feel like Winter now where you are? Are you excited about dressing for the upcoming season, or sad to see Fall go? (And, for my readers south of the Equator, just reverse the seasons 🙂 !)

Outfit Details:

Beret: ? I think my sister gave me this one?

Scarf: Thrifted- my sister gave me this too! 

Clutch: Vintage

Shoes: Gabor

Coat: Hell Bunny

Skirt: Thrifted

Blouse: From my Mom

Brooch: Also from my Mom

Earrings: Also gifted. (Wow I get a lot of stuff from my family. Thanks, eh!)

Necklace: Also had for years

Tights: What Katie Did Retro Seamed Dot Tights with Dots (ps- I love these, and have worn them several times with nary a run or snag to be seen yet! Definitely a good quality purchase.)

beret-brooch-and-coat, the artyologist

wool beret, what to wear with weather like this, the artyologist

vintage clutch, the artyologist

portrait, wool beret, the artyologist

leaf-and-necklace, the artyologist

trench-and-clouds, the artyologist

walking-away, vintage wool skirt, the artyologist

Life Lately (And it’s already November?)

Life Lately (And It's Already November?) The artyologist, sunset

Well, to be honest “life lately” around here has been less than ideal. I came down with a head cold last week, and I am still trying to get over that. I hate being sick at any time, but right now seems to be the worst timing, as I am getting behind at work, and trying to get things in order for my craft shows at the end of the month. I don’t even want to look at my to-do list 🙁 And, somehow October is gone, and we are already a week into November? And, all I want to do is get better now, so I can get on with being busy, but that seems to be taking an extremely long time to happen. . .

Nevertheless, I do still have this blog that needs tending to, and I do still take pictures wherever I go, so here are some that I have taken in the last month, that I thought I would share with you all. Some of them have made an appearance on Instagram, so if you follow me there, you may have seen them, but some are new!

How is your first week of November going?

life lately, the artyologist, winter coming, fog

life lately, leaves, street, the artyologist

Right: A most idyllic street, found in a recent trip to Edmonton (via incorrect GPS directions!) Just take away the trucks and the window reflection = when can I move in? 🙂

fog, the artyologist

The eery, and beautiful fog. . . 

berries, valley, the artyologist

A bright pop of winter colour. 

Fashion Isn’t About You

Fashion Isn't About You, the artyologist

We live in an era and a society that is obsessed with things like health. We use organic beauty products, because we know they are better for us. We clean with earth friendly products, so we don’t pollute our homes. We eat healthy and organic foods to minimize our risk of cancer. We know that eventually we will all die, and yet, we do what we can to improve our quality of life in the here and now. And yes, all of these things are great. We should avoid the practices that we know are bad for us, and do the things that are good for us (as far as we know that they are good for us!)

There is one element that is centre to all of these practices though, and that is that they are all good for you. As in, you personally.

Ethical Fashion is not something you do for you. It is something you do for someone else.

Ethical fashion, to be really honest, doesn’t benefit you personally in any way whatsoever. In fact, one could argue, it’s really a pain and a bother when it comes right down to it.

Fair trade fashion is often more expensive than the fast fashion garments you can find at your local mall. Fair trade and ethically made garments can be hard to find: most of your local chain stores don’t carry responsible brands in stock (especially here in Canada). And, sometimes the fair trade fashions you do find, will not be your fashion style. Building a fair trade wardrobe involves research. Which brands are ethical? Where did this come from? And really, #whomademyclothes? Being a conscious consumer involves constant questioning; not just, “Do I want this?” but, “Do I need this”? And, then there is always the question of, “What is the longevity of this garment?” Sometimes ethical fashion means going without something, until you can find it in an ethical and fair trade version.

Other options to buying fair trade fashion would be practices like thrifting, or buying vintage. This takes time though. To build a second-hand wardrobe, you put in countless hours searching for pieces that you not only like, but that fit, and are in good condition as well. Vintage is rare, depending on where you live, and it can be hard to find. You can’t just stop in at your local store to pick out exactly what you want and need. And once you find the thrifted or vintage garment you are looking for, it will require upkeep that new garments don’t. Mending and fixing go hand-in-hand with pre-loved garments.

Another option is making your own clothes. This again, is a large time investment (especially if you are like me, and are an extremely slow seamstress.) It also means acquiring the skills to be able to make the garments yourself, as you want to end up with something wearable; not a “Becky-Home-Ecky” that should be turned into a rag. And again, with new fabrics and textile, you must question, “Where did this fabric come from?” With reused textiles, you run into other problems and the quirks that come along with refashioning.

Ethical fashion is hard. Creating a wardrobe full of garments that are fair trade, where the workers who sewed your clothes (because each and every piece of clothing has been made by human hands, somewhere) are earning a wage they can truly live on, is really frustrating sometimes.

But, nobody should have to die for fashion.

That shouldn’t even be a thought that enters the equation. Because really, there should be no such term as “Ethical Fashion”. That is so redundant it’s like saying “Edible Food”.

Nobody should have to drop out of school at nine years old to go to work, just to be able to put food on the table.

Nobody should have to work with toxic fabric dyes, and no safety equipment, in order to afford their monthly rent.

And nobody should have to go to work in an unsafe factory, which may collapse at any moment, in order to survive . . . but end up dying instead.

Because nobody’s life is worth less than a t-shirt.

Fashion is something that shouldn’t be only about you. Your clothes might seem like a highly personal choice, but instead I would challenge you to view your wardrobe with an outward focus too and take a moment to think about how what you buy ultimately impacts the lives of those who you may not be able to see, but are affected nevertheless. And then not only think about it, but see what steps you can take to make a difference.

 “Demand quality, not just in the products you buy, but in the life of the person who made it.”- Orsola De Castro

As I mentioned last week, October is Slow Fashion Month, and Fair Trade Month. I know it’s the last week, but I didn’t want the month to pass by without sharing some of my ethical fashion journey, and the reasons behind why I am building my wardrobe the way that I am. This weeks prompt is “Known Origins”. There is a story behind each and every garment tag, and usually it is a story we’ll never know. But it is those stories, and the realities that garment workers are facing around the world every day, that are shaping my wardrobe choices. It’s not always an easy journey, and sometimes I really just wish that I could throw in the towel and go and buy all the things. I do fail sometimes, making purchases that I end up regretting, because I know that they aren’t ethical purchases. Overall I have come to a point in my wardrobe, though, where I just don’t feel good about wearing cheap fashion, with unknown origins. And so, I choose to wear slow fashion whenever possible, because of the lives of the people behind the garment tags. Because, as I said before, nobody’s life is worth less than a t-shirt.

How to Create a Modern 1920’s Makeup Look

Lipstick:  Mary Kay, True Dimensions (I was not happy with this product either, and have since returned the lipstick.)
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One other note: I was not sponsored in any way for the making of this post (although that would have been nice!) These are all products I have purchased myself, and use daily 🙂 Except for the ones that I didn’t like. 🙁 -Nicole

Happy (Canadian) Thanksgiving!

Happy (Canadian) Thanksgiving, graineries, the artyologist

Happy Thanksgiving to my fellow Canadians!

I love Thanksgiving for several reasons:

  • Pumpkin pie and a roast turkey. (Self explanatory.)
  • It always falls near my birthday (which is today, the 7th!) so I get a long weekend. When I was little this was annoying as I could never have my party near my birthday, but now it is great!
  • It is a great opportunity to take time to consciously think about the things I am thankful for.

I think it is so great that we have a holiday designated simply to giving Thanks. Thanksgiving was made into an official holiday in 1879 as “a day of General Thanksgiving to Almighty God for the bountiful harvest with which Canada has been blessed,” although it was no new idea, as it stretches back for centuries, as a day of giving thanks to God for the harvest, and also in the US for the safe arrival of the pilgrims in 1621 on the Mayflower. (I also just found out that there is some discussion that perhaps Thanksgiving in Canada dates back to 1578, when Martin Frobisher’s expedition in search of the Northwest Passage, was almost destroyed, but after arriving safely in Frobisher Bay, a day of thanks was taken as the minister on board encouraged them “especially to be thankful to God for their strange and miraculous deliverance in those so dangerous places …” Found out via the source of all internet knowledge: Wikipedia)

As Thanksgiving is this Monday (October 10) I thought that it would be a perfect time to think about the things that I am thankful for. They are obviously too numerous to count, but here are a few that I thought of. I hope that, whether you are celebrating Thanksgiving this weekend, or next month, that you have a lovely day full of thanksgiving, even if it isn’t a designated holiday!

  • That Jesus Christ has saved me, not because of anything that I have done to deserve it (quite the opposite actually!) but because of His great love for me.
  • For a loving family and friends
  • For our abundant harvest too!

happy canadian thanksgiving, our fall harvest, the artyologist

  • The changing seasons. I love fall time, as I have mentioned before.

Happy (Canadian) Thanksgiving, Fall Seasons, the artyologist

  • For creativity and an artistic bent
  • That I have the ability to sew my own clothes

happy canadian thanksgiving, sewing space, the artyologist

  • That I live in Canada.
  • My blog, and the creative outlet it gives me.
  • The online community that I have not only become a part of, but constantly find inspiration from and learn from.
  • And further on that note: Each and every one of my amazing readers! Your support of my little blog, and the comments you leave, and the friendships I am forming with all of you is the best! I am so glad for the online community, so thank-you so much for being a part of that!

Are you celebrating Thanksgiving this Monday? What are some things you are thankful for?

Happy (Canadian) Thanksgiving, taking a photo for the blog, the artyologist