fashion history

What the Grahams Wore on Easter Sunday: A Fashion Moment with Canadian Home Journal 1941

What the Grahams Wore on Easter Sunday, Canadian Home Journal 1941, the artyologist

Just what will the Grahams wear for Easter Sunday? Why, I’m so glad you asked . . . because I just happen to have a three page spread showing just that!

what the grahams will wear, Canadian Home Journal 1941 the artyologist

My brother gave me this Canadian Home Journal from April of 1941, this past Christmas, and I’ve been eagerly waiting to share it with you all, because there is an entire section in the magazine featuring Singer sewing machines, and Butterick patterns! I haven’t figured out yet what I am going to wear this Easter Sunday, but any of these patterns would be delightful, don’t you think? It’s too bad I won’t be able to make any of these lovely dresses, but at least we can enjoy looking at them, right?

The article on the right page talks about how Mrs. S. Armstrong, of Montreal, wanted to have “more pretty clothes- for much less money”, and so she decided to sew them herself. However, there was just one problem- she didn’t know how to sew! But, no problem, she just went to her nearest Singer Sewing Centre, and enrolled in their Three Free Lessons. “There the obliging sewing instructress showed her how easy and simple it is to sew- and save- the Singer way.” Now Mrs. Armstrong has become “quite the expert” and “does all her own sewing- on the modern Singer electric Mr. Armstrong gave her for her birthday”. Furthermore, “the Singer Sewing Centre in your town is always ready to help you. Go there for wardrobe ideas, for advice on a sewing problem, or for “short course” lessons in dressmaking or home decorating. All these services are free!” Well, I just want to pop over my local vintage Singer Sewing Centre now, don’t you?

what-mrs-graham-taught, canadian home journal 1941, the artyologist

This dress, above, is just perfection!

striped-blouse, canadian home journal 1941, butterick 1419 and butterick 1440, the artyologist

I love this striped blouse and suit from Butterick 1440.

what-they-will-wear, canadian home journal 1941, the artyologist

Here is what Margaret, Ailsa, Dorothy, and Peg Graham will wear.

orange-dress, canadian home journal 1941, butterick 1444 and 1451, the artyologist

Dorothy likes the “high surplice neckline” of Butterick 1444 and the “wide midriff belt” of 1451, above.

wardrobe spice, canadian home journal 1941, butterick 1407 and 1453, the artyologist

Ailsa “likes the shirred pockets” in this Butterick 1407 suit. Also pictured is Butterick 1453. On the other page, we are shown how to add some “spice’ to your outfit!

wardrobe-spice, canadian home journal, the artyologist

There will be “many pleasant uses for these important additions to the Spring costumes they are planning”.

butterick dresses, canadian home journal, butterick 1462 and butterick 1160, the artyologist

Margaret likes the “saddle shoulders in both the dress and the coat of this ensemble because they give a broad shoulder line”. Broad shoulders were definitely the thing in the 40’s! Butterick 1462 includes both the coat and the dress. And Peg, on the right, likes the “slim lines of this reefer which buttons up to a high collar” Butterick 1160 and 1465.

cape, canadian home journal 1941, butterick 1456, the artyologist

And lastly, my favourite is this ensemble with Butterick 1456. I love everything about this: the cape, the handbag, the cool folded hat. . .  the officer (haha just kidding!)

Which of the patterns from this issue of Canadian Home Journal do you like the best? Don’t you wish you could still order things from old magazines and catalogues, when you browse through them? Have you ever seen an issue of Canadian Home Journal before? And, have you picked out what you are going to wear for Easter yet?

Vintage Covers: Vogue, May 1952, Summer Blues

Vintage Vogue: Summer Blues, the artyologist

Blue is the colour of the season. A crisp, tailored buttoned dress is both classic and stylish, especially when accented with a pale blue platter hat and earrings. A swipe of bright blue eyeshadow, lightens the entire look, making it so very fresh and of-the-moment. Pair these summer blues with a simple black patent purse and gloves for a look that is instantly elegant. While the summer may be nearly spent, this ensemble is most certainly not.

Here is the first cover I am sharing this month for My Vintage Cover. Depending on how things go, I will attempt to do another (who knows, maybe I will be ambitious and share one a week. . . ) Anyways, I was planning on sharing this cover next week, but after a drama where I lost the flash drive that the edited picture was on, (I found it exactly where it should have been after two days of looking. Yes, I did look in that drawer, it was just between some papers!) and then getting a sinus cold this week which prevented me from doing any other blog post for today, I have decided to share the photos today. (Just in case there was anything else going to go wrong and prevent me!)

I was originally going to do a completely different cover, because I don’t have a blue hat, but then I decided to try photoshopping one of my white hats blue. While I wouldn’t say that it looks very realistic, it’s OK, because I do think it has that distinctive hand-tinted look of old photographs. And then, after seeing Tanith’s great cover a few days ago, I decided to add text in the same fonts to make mine look more like the actual vintage Vogue cover. So there you have it. It was fun to try and recreate a cover with all the details, for a change.

I hope you are enjoying seeing the vintage covers so far. There aren’t very many participants so far, but to see the ones people have done already, you can check out the Instagram tag here.

vintage vogue cover, may 1952 vogue cover, summer blues

My Vintage Cover Begins Today!

Happy First Day of August- and on that note- also the first day of the My Vintage Cover challenge!

I can’t believe that August is already here (really, where did July go?!) but I am so excited that My Vintage Cover is starting. To get you in the mood, here are some covers I have come across in my image searches, which I think might just be “easy” to replicate. And, if you have no idea what I am talking about, you can read all of the details here or scroll to the end of this post, for an abbreviated version of events!

This cover basically relies on a large amount of flowers. And they could be any flowers too- it’s the impact and vast quantity that makes this cover recognizable.

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Such an artistic and striking pose. Do you have a large hat? You could probably recreate this one!

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This one relies mainly on the blue makeup, a turned up collar and a simple hat.

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Blue eyeshadow and a beehive. If you do any of these two things, you are halfway there to recreating a look from the 60’s!

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This iconic cover would actually be really great to recreate, because it is black and white and you wouldn’t need to worry about colour matching your clothing! It’s all about the silhouette.

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Those of you with bakelite collections could probably pull this one off fairly easily. I thought about doing this one, but I don’t own any colourful bracelets!

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Some covers rely mainly on the creative makeup, like this one.

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Again, I think that this one could be easy to recreate, as long as you have a platter hat. It mostly relies on the pose.

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Another cover with striking makeup and hair, this time from the 70’s. You don’t have to pick a really old cover to recreate.

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A relatively simple cover with not too many exotic items or difficult poses.

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Recreating an illustration could be kind of fun. This one from the 1920’s features a relatively simple outfit- simple compared to most of the fantastical covers of the era!

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Two very similar covers, one from the 30’s and one from the 50’s, which consist mainly of swathing ones self in a fur.

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This cover from the 1980’s had Grace Coddington as creative director, and it is so simple yet striking.image source

Again this relies heavily on the makeup and hair. I think that my sister and I are going to try this one- she’ll do the makeup, and I’ll be the model!

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This one relies completely on the 50’s makeup. This is one of my favourite covers because it’s so artistic.

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Got a wicker basket? You can do this! 😉 haha!

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If you just happen to have a red ballgown, tall gloves and a fan lying around, recreate this one now because I want to see it.

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Do you have a bird? (I don’t even know what bird that is) If you do, then please feel free to recreate this one.

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Do you have access to a butterfly sanctuary? If so, then this might be a good one for you to recreate. 😉

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Well, I hope that these covers give you some inspiration and ideas- especially the last three 🙂 Tanith has also been sharing some covers, so if none of these seem to fit, hop over and check her post out. And if you’d like to see the covers I have done in the past, you can find them here.

Even if you aren’t planning on taking part in the My Vintage Cover challenge- I hope you enjoyed seeing all these great magazine covers!

Again, here is the condensed version of the My Vintage Cover challenge, being hosted by Tanith and I.

-Running August 1- 31, 2017.

-This is a non-competitive event; we just want people to have fun! 

-Tag your recreations with #myvintagecover on Instagram or post them on your blog.

-We may post a few “round-ups” depending on how many people participate

-You can recreate a vintage magazine cover (such as Vogue, Harper’s Bazaar or McCall’s) or an editorial vintage fashion image. Images with distinctive poses, or styles that are iconic to a specific era are great options.

-Repost & share your inspiration image, or link to it, so everyone can compare the recreations and originals

-Recreate as many images as you would like! There is no limit!

Vintage Covers: Vogue March 15, 1911, Elegant Spring Attire

Vintage Vogue Covers: Vogue March 15, 1911, Elegant Spring Attire, the artyologist

Vogue March 15, 1911: The Newest Spring Materials and Trimmings . . . which herald the arrival of the season.

With fresh, bright colours and light, airy fabrics, the arrival of Spring is welcomed with this lovely mint chiffon and lace ensemble. Softly draped fabrics are an elegant choice for these warm Spring days, but for the still-cool evenings a floral patterned shawl is the perfect addition. A single gold bracelet lends a touch of exoticism to this simple, yet graceful, silhouette.

Inspiration for this fashion recreation comes from this cover of Vogue from 1911. I’ve been wanting to do a more “historical” Vogue cover recreation for a while now, and this dress I bought a few years ago on a whim (and have only worn once as a costume!) was perfect to recreate this lovely Edwardian era magazine cover.

Vintage Vogue Covers: Vogue March 15, 1911, Elegant Spring Attire, the artyologist vogue-cover-original